Is the iPhone Update designed to kill older iPhones? “Why Apple is (supposedly) making your old iPhone better

This is the article by the Sydney Morning Herald:. Why Apple is making your old iPhone better than ever:

Apple executives said the new system, iOS 12, would be different. Older phones, going back to the 2013 model year, would work better this time, not worse. “We’re focusing our efforts especially on the oldest devices,” Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, said in June. “While it’s still early days, we’re excited with the results that we’ve seen.”

that makes us trust iOS 12. And I did, Installing iOS 12 on my only phone, and for a couple of days, things worked fine.

Then my phone froze while using the Camera app. My iPhone 6s+ is old, but I do not use it constantly, so generally, when I go to bed, it goes into the bedside charger with about 60% charge remaining.

BUT over the last 2-3 days, by mid-day battery is down to 40-50% and an hour later I have a phone with 7-9% battery , and is basically dead. 

 

My habits have not changed, I have not installed new apps. I listen to podcasts, take photos, even make a phone call or two when (absolutely) necessary. I use Instagram and Twitter while I sit on the toilet, so 5-10 minutes a day 

Something has changed, within the last 72 Hrs.

Could Apple be playing a long game that Bricks older phones in a way that is undetectable? “Oh, sorry, we did our best with software, but there must be a real hardware issue. Visit an Apple store right now…” to be told Your device is dead, buy a new one??

I do NOT know, but I would take future software upgrades / updates with caution.

Pleas let me know if you have more information on this issue.

 

Enjoy!

 

Phil Stephens

 

 

Challenger Center – Teacher in Space

Challenger:The Shuttle Disaster

I was sitting up, trying to help my baby son through colic, and watching television, when the Challenger blew up, on TV, In front of me.

I dragged my sleeping wife out of bed to share this terrible moment.

Screen Shot 2018 08 16 at 7 49 45 pm

For me, the seminal moment was watching a NASA PR person pull Christa McAlliffes parents off the viewing platform, as they tried to figure out what had happened.

NASA has honoured her, by performing the experiments she was going to perform in zero gravity on the space shuttle, years later,  on the ISS.

Look at them here, and think for a moment about the price she paid in the hope of educating her students.

Sharon Christa Corrigan McAuliffe – Teacher-in-Space Payload Specialistcher-in-Space Payload Specialist

Why Facebook is losing the war on hate speech in Myanmar

Why Facebook is losing the war on hate speech in Myanmar:

Facebook, once again shows itself to be wanting. Mark Zuckerberg’s god is money, and to hell with all the poor people…

His position on the Du*b Fu*ks is on record.

One day, he will be held to account for his failures.

 

Even now, Facebook doesn’t have a single employee in the country of some 50 million people. Instead, it monitors hate speech from abroad. This is mainly done through a secretive operation in Kuala Lumpur that’s outsourced to Accenture, the professional services firm, and codenamed “Project Honey Badger.”

According to people familiar with the matter, the project, which handles many Asian countries, hired its first two Burmese speakers, who were based in Manila, just three years ago. As of June, Honey Badger had about 60 people reviewing reports of hate speech and other content posted by Myanmar’s 18 million active Facebook users. Facebook itself in April had three full-time Burmese speakers at a separate monitoring operation at its international headquarters in Dublin, according to a former employee.

Honey Badger employees typically sign one-year renewable contracts and agree not to divulge that the client is Facebook. Reuters interviewed more than a half-dozen former monitors who reviewed Southeast Asian content.

A Facebook official said outsourcing its content monitoring is more efficient because the companies it uses are specialists in ramping up such operations. He declined to disclose how many Burmese speakers the company has on the job worldwide, saying it was “impossible to know, to be definitive on that.”

“It’s not enough,” he added.

Google Pixel 2 XL: Like paying Apple-tier prices then saying, hey, please help yourself to my data • The Register

Google Pixel 2 XL: Like paying Apple-tier prices then saying, hey, please help yourself to my data • The Register:

Is Google double dipping? It is selling a premium priced phone, like Apple, but still wants our data:

Re Register points out:

All that changed in 2016 as Google adopted the Pixel brand instead and poured hundreds of millions of dollars into marketing. This entailed a significant price hike, what we called “the Mountain View equivalent of the Cupertino idiot tax”. It was an, um, interesting decision.

In its splash screens Apple says it believes “privacy is a fundamental human right”. But it can afford to: Apple merely sells overpriced hardware and doesn’t use your data for targeting advertisements as its main source of income. The Apple “tax” is the price you pay for privacy. With Pixel, Google wanted to keep Apple inflated margin and slurp up all your data, too?

It seemed a lot to ask, especially since the first 2016 Pixels were good without being standout attractive.

Beware of scammers impersonating energy and telecommunications companies | Scamwatch

Beware of scammers impersonating energy and telecommunications companies | Scamwatch:

Beware of scammers impersonating energy and telecommunications companies 24 April 2018 The ACCC is warning consumers to beware of scammers impersonating energy and telecommunications providers and demanding payments.

Scamwatch has received 5000 reports of fake billing scams in the last 12 months, with reported losses of close to $8000.

“The scammers typically impersonate well known companies such as Origin, AGL, Telstra and Optus via email, to fool people into assuming the bills are real,” ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said.

“They send bulk emails or letters which include a logo and design features closely copied from the genuine provider. The bill states the account is overdue and if not paid immediately the customer will incur late charges or be disconnected.”

Facebook said: most people could have had their public profile copied…

First it was 50 million, then it was 87 Million, now it is 2.2 BILLION!

“We believe most people on Facebook could have had their public profile scraped in this way.”

Oh! Shock! Horror! Farcebook lied/ Forgot/ Prevaricated/ Obfuscated/ stuffed up AGAIN. Imagine That!

That wonderful, open, disingenuous honest lad Mark Zuckerberg made a teen, tiny mistake.

It was (Once Again) LOTS more people

Facebook Just Made A Shocking Admission, And We’re All Too Exhausted To Notice | Gizmodo Australia:

Mike Schroepfer, Facebook’s chief technology officer, explained that prior to yesterday, “people could enter another person’s phone number or email address into Facebook search to help find them.” This function would help you cut through all the John Smiths and locate the page of your John Smith. He gave the example of Bangladesh where the tool was used for 7 per cent of all searches. Thing is, it was also useful to data-scrapers. Schroepfer wrote:

However, malicious actors have also abused these features to scrape public profile information by submitting phone numbers or email addresses they already have through search and account recovery. Given the scale and sophistication of the activity we’ve seen, we believe most people on Facebook could have had their public profile scraped in this way. So we have now disabled this feature. We’re also making changes to account recovery to reduce the risk of scraping as well.

#DeleteFacebook

Facebook admits 311,000 Australians had their Data Stolen

Facebook admits your data has probably been scraped by ‘malicious actors’ – ABC News

the company disclosed they “do not know precisely what data the app shared with Cambridge Analytica or exactly how many people were impacted”.

Facebook chief executive officer Mark Zuckerberg said they calculated the 87 million figure by constructing “the maximum possible number of friends lists that everyone could have had over the time, and assumed that [Cambridge University scholar Aleksandr] Kogan queried each person at the time when they had the maximum number of connections that would’ve been available to them”.

“That’s where we came up with this 87 million number. We wanted to take a broad view that is a conservative estimate,” he said.

The REAL story here is that Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg has once again failed to offer any real protection to his users. The reason, of course it that the users are not the customers.

Facebook’s customers are those willing to pay for access to the astounding database of personal information that Facebook has developed. You can access this data by buying ads inside the Facebook platform, or using it sport information into your own database. This is what Cambridge Analytica did, and, apparently an endless list of others.

Remember, it is always easier to ask for forgiveness, than to ask for permission. This is a lesson Zuck (or F**k as many  are now  calling) him learned many years ago.

He considers his users as “Dumb Fu*k’s” for giving him their information. Well, I guess they are…

Welcome to the world of Farcebook. Time to #DeleteFacebook…

Enjoy!

Facebook told to stop tracking in Belgium

Facebook told to stop tracking in Belgium – BBC News

Facebook has been ordered to stop tracking people without consent, by a court in Belgium.

The company has been told to delete all the data it had gathered on people who did not use Facebook. The court ruled the data was gathered illegally.

Belgium’s privacy watchdog said the website had broken privacy laws by placing tracking code – known as cookies – on third-party websites.

Facebook said it would appeal against the ruling.

The social network faces fines of 250,000 euros (£221,000, $311,000) a day if it does not comply.

The court said Facebook must “stop following and recording internet use by people surfing in Belgium, until it complies with Belgian privacy laws”.

“Facebook must also destroy all personal data obtained illegally.”

The ruling is the latest in a long-running dispute between the social network and the Belgian commission for the protection of privacy (CPP).

In 2015, the CPP complained that Facebook tracked people when they visited pages on the site or clicked “like” or “share”, even if they were not members.

It won its case, but Facebook had the verdict overturned in 2016.

Now the court has again agreed with the findings of the CPP.

Facebook said it was “disappointed” by the verdict.

Top tip: Don’t bother with Facebook’s two-factor SMS auth – unless you love phone spam – The Register

Thanks to Shaun Nichols at the Register for a good article on ANOTHER fail by facebook.

Top tip: Don’t bother with Facebook’s two-factor SMS auth – unless you love phone spam • The Register:

Top tip: Don’t bother with Facebook’s two-factor SMS auth – unless you love phone spam Pick another 2FA method: Social network is having a What The Zuck moment By Shaun Nichols in San Francisco.

Forget fake news, Russian trolls and the gradual cruel destruction of journalism – now Facebook is taking heat for spamming a netizen’s phone with text messages after he signed up for SMS-based two-factor authentication.

Software engineer Gabriel Lewis said this week that after he activated the security measure with his cellphone number, he began to receive not just one-time login tokens as expected, but texts from Facebook with links to stuff happening on the social network.

Going digital: How to take your music, movies, and books with you

A big problem for every minimalist, down-sizer, or digital nomad is how do I cope with the mass of books, music, movies and other entertainment I have bought over the years?

 

Rene Ritchie at iMore gives his approach at iMore.com:

Going digital: How to turn your music, movie, and book atoms into bits! | iMore:

How do you replace all your old physical media — your music, newspapers and magazines, books and comics, movies and TV shows, with shiny, new, space-saving bits? More easily than you might think!

In the case of using online sources such as iTunes, Google Play and Netflix, a good internet connection is essential.

For me, this is often not an option. If I am in a remote area, or a country or location with bad or no internet, streaming services are useless.

I have made more of an effort to save or convert much of the digital. Heritage I have collected, including ripping my music CDs and Video DVDs. The problem with my approach is that I meed to keep the physical disks as a defence against accusations that I have pirated the music and movies, so storage is required.

In that case, the storage needs to be local.

What have you done with your media?