Sinking the Chromebook Myth – It Does Work Offline!

Samsung Chromebook
The Samsung Chromebook

There is endless carping by ill-informed or ignorant pundits talking about Chromebooks being “bricks without WiFi”. It is time to look at that with fresh eyes.

I am shocked to discover I have not written about the offline  capabilities of the Chromebook. I have written a lot in comments on other Blogs, and lost track of the fact that I have not discussed it here.

The 31 Day Chromebook Challenge – Day 30

My 31 Day Chromebook Challenge is drawing to a close. And it is time to speak out about the Chrome OS. Most of this article was written in the passenger seat of my car, definitely offline. And with no problems at all.

I am writing this on the Samsung chromebook. I am offline, typing in Write Space using a fairly large font. I like the ability to set up Write Space with colours, fonts and page width. I am writing is less than perfect viewing conditions, and It is perfectly readable and comfortable.

I am listening to music saved to the downloads folder through my headphones, writing until a 25 minute countdown timer to tells me to take a break, and I have access to lots of notes in Google Keep and saved from Feedly into Pocket.

So, here is the executive summary for you impatient types:

Offline, with the default Chromebook installation I can:

  • Manage Files – Move, copy, delete and more with The file manager
  • Read and edit e-mail, and send when connected with Gmail offline
  • Edit  all types of documents with Google Docs
  • Create, read and search notes in Keep.
  • Set reminders and alarms in Keep
  • View my Calendar in Google Calendar
  • Use Calculator – A simple calculator, but it works offline
  • Audio & Video player – Part of the Files app. Most music and video files just play. Even from External drives and devices
  • Display a presentation in Full Screen mode and use the HDMI port to send it to a projector
  • Take photos using the (front facing) camera app.

With apps from the Play Store I can:

The Things I CANNOT do:

  • Capture or edit audio or video (offline)
  • Open a zip file
  • Open an encrypted volume
  • Access Dropbox folders and files (offline)
  • Use Evernote (offline)

All in all, I can do a hell of a lot with a Chromebook. And I have close to 9 hours of battery life in lecture note taking mode, with WiFi off and screen brightness lowered.

And I have six or more hours plus in full working mode.

I intend to write a lot more about ChromeOS and Chrome apps in the Future. I also have some words about the Microsoft Scroogled Toadies and their severely slanted views.

Enjoy! – Phil Stephens

 

 

Chromebook Challenge Day 3 – Remote Support – A Problem Overcome

Chromebook
Image by Zoinno

The Chromebook challenge began badly. On the second day I had to provide some technical support for a friend in another state. Unfortunately she is barely coherent, technically, despite having a degree in another field. As a result I soon had to fall back on accessing her machine remotely to make some configuration changes to her wireless router.

I know remote management of another computer is possible on a Chromebook using Chrome Remote Desktop.

This requires the installation of Chrome and the Remote Desktop plugin, on the client or host machine, and this was more than I thought we could manage, so I booted a Windows laptop up for this situation.

There is another solution, the new Google Hangouts Remote Desktop. This is an addon, easily accessed in Hangouts, even while a hangout is in progress. Unfortunately either the Samsung Chromebook, or my bandwidth was not adequate, and the remote connection was painfully slow, and audio was reduced to a Cylon snarl. I gave up fairly quickly.

The Chrome Remote Desktop option, however is improving, and works very well. There is now an option to install the Remote Desktop software on a PC in Permanent Access Mode so that you can connect to it even before it is logged in. (Chrome Support shows how here: https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/1649523?hl=en )

Chrome remote login
Chrome remote login

I installed this service on a Windows 7 Netbook and logged in easily as soon as it booted up. 

Logging into Windows 7 Remotely
Logging into Windows 7 Remotely

If you are required to do remote support, I strongly recommend installing this service and appying a STRONG PIN to protect the host computer. Once done, you can log in at any point from any computer with a Chrome browser. That obviously includes a Chromebook.

Another problem solved!

The Chromebook Challenge Day Two – Write Space

Samsung Chromebook
The Samsung Chromebook

Well, here I am on day two of the 31 day Chromebook challenge. It has not been without problems, one of them causing me to use a Windows PC to do a remote support call. I now know how to do that from ChromeOS and will write about it when I can do some more research.

The first question I asked when I started using a Chromebook a couple of months ago was what will I use as a text editor? The obvious choice would seem to be Google Docs or a Google Drive Document. Drive (For now, I will call them Google Docs) has formatting, spell-check and word-count, all things important to a writer. And despite the the “without WiFi it is a brick” whining of the Microsoft Scroogled campaign’s lapdogs, it works perfectly offline, accessing and editing all your documents, as long as you have allowed them to sync with Google before going offline.

But I have one problem with Google Docs as a general purpose text editor. A Google document can be quite hard to view in field conditions. I spend a lot of my day on buses and in the sun, with my Samsung Chromebook Series 3 on my lap. A big, clear screen is vital.

I am currently using Write Space, a full-screen text editor. Write Space is basic. A handful of basic key-strokes, a status bar at the bottom of the screen with Words, Lines and Characters typed.

Write Space
Write Space, Configured the way I like it!

There is no menu, and no save option. Everything I type is saved locally. It has no file save option. Text just gets saved to the local Chrome storage, and is kept. To use it elsewhere, it must be cut and pasted to a Doc file, Keep, or a text file.

I using Write Space because of the simplicity of the screen and the ability to re-configure it. If you go to the Chrome > plugins > settings menu you can change the page width, font size and colour. Save the settings, and Write Space instantly updates its look an feel.

I am writing in a large, pale blue font on a dark blue background on a page that is 800 pixels wide. It is large, easy on the eyes and very responsive. It is visible in low light. I can read the large font easily when using the computer on my lap. It is a little reminiscent of the Wordperfect screen of the eighties, and easy on the eyes.

There is a spell-checker that works well, even when offline. The usual short cuts work, including the undo function.

When I hit the full-screen key (the equivalent of F11 in a Windows Chrome browser) I have a full, uncluttered and simple screen that allows me to work without distraction.

It is hard to get any simpler, and hard to think of more that a few hundred words to say about an editor that just works. I have never lost a word, and occasionally I copy everything into Keep so it will sync across every device I use.

All in all, I recommend Write Space as a simple and reliable text editor.

Enjoy!